Tag Archives: swimming

Do we ever know?

Excuse this delayed post. It happened at the time by hard drive crashed and the fixers at an unnamed repair store were serving me in a smug way. So I forgot about the incident until a recent visit to the Johnson & Johnson — a friend’s boat (no relation to anyone with money, just mold).

While cruising in the Great South Bay, Isabella jumped off the boat into a very strong current. To be fair, the captain had already jumped in the water for some reason. You never question the captain, especially this one. To test the current? To cool off? To take a whiz? He did say that Isabella should not jump in, though she was poised with a properly-fitting vest on the dive deck or whatever it’s called. I definitely said not to jump. And it happened — she jumped. Several people screamed. And then I jumped.

Isabella and I were quickly swept away by the current. The boat was not as close as I would have liked. It was still light out, so that was good. At some point, though it was later, my husband jumped in the water. Because he is about twice my size, he was taken by the current much more quickly, rendering him useless in his effort to join us in the water. (On a positive note, the water was lovely.) Someone on the boat threw us a rope with nothing attached to it. Swimming back to the boat was not an an option. Eventually someone on the boat (probably a woman) drove the boat and picked us up.

Of course, Isabella had no clue that she caused several adults to become quite frightened. The captain and the first mate (his wife, my BFF) were unusually quite — until he asked what was going to happen to Isabella? No one had ever asked me that question. I had asked myself the question often, but hearing it from a friend who knew me for a very long time was different.

I don’t know what’s going to happen. Do we ever?

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Swimming, really

Another new development. Somewhat astounding for our 13-year-old. Perhaps, not so for other 13-year-olds, unless the child has an anxiety disorder. Swimming. I mean running into the surf in the Atlantic Ocean and loving it! Really loving it. What this means is that the sensory defensiveness is gone. It’s not about being afraid once and now being brave. It’s about clinically not being able to tolerate something. Bike riding is not about balancing. It’s about staying on the bicycle long enough to say that you’re riding a bike. It’s about enjoying the waves crashing on  your body. And how about jumping off the lifeguard stand? Could it be the new drink that I make Isabella every morning — that she drinks (mostly) without complaining and sometimes requests? Working at the celluar level, again.