Tag Archives: ADHD

How far is too far?

When you have a child who needs help, you will do anything for your child. This applies to all children. If your kid shows potential as an artist, parents will provide supplies, enroll the child in classes, or contact a friend who owns a gallery for advice. Parents of children with developmental delays are no different. Well, maybe a little different. We will really go the distance…and sometimes that distance may be too far.

Is it too far when we drive our children to appointments with therapists that take 3 hours round-trip — even when there a great therapists in our towns? We do this because our children have a better rapport with the 3-hour-drive therapist. Is it too far when have our entire family eliminate gluten from the diet because we have been told that our child has a drug-like response to gluten? We do this because we believe our dietitian and because the whole family goes on stand-by together.

In this vein of perhaps going too far, I took Isabella for her virgin neurofeedback session. The drive was not taxing (except for the traffic on the way home) and I do not plan on asking any other family members to use neurofeedback. Here’s why I’m not certain if I’ve gone too far. Among the forms that I was asked to complete about Isabella was a symptom check list. I hesitantly checked hyperphagia. It’s something that I know a bit about as a dietitian — it’s an inability to know when to stop eating. I also checked impulsivity, not hesitantly. Combined, hyperphagia and impulsivity are a bad combination. The result:  grabbing 7 cookies from a tray after eating a large meal and proceeding to eat all of them within minutes.

So, the MD who administered the neurofeedback informed me that its impact would last a few hours following this first session. Next time, the positive effects would last longer. We got home, I went upstairs for about 2 minutes or less. I came down to find Isabella surreptitiously stuffing a box into recycling. As I came closer, I realized that she had eaten all 3 (as in 3 children) of the chocolate treats…in that 2 minutes or less. Her coat and backpack were still on. I guess we’ll wait until a few sessions to see if the positive fall-out of neurofeedback lasts for more than the car ride home. After all, we did sit in traffic.

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School & nutrition

Finally, a parent-teacher conference where the teacher didn’t recount all of Isabella’s shortcomings. How they have tried every math program available, including the one that I insisted on, and have had zero success. How her inability to stay on topic hinders all of her attempts at class participation. How reading, well, reading — Orton-Gilingham should be working; it works with every other child with dyslexia. I dreaded those meetings. Truth be told, I avoided them. I let the teachers phone me, so they couldn’t see my stricken face. This year, however, I filled out the form to attend the conference and remembered (rather than conveniently forgot) to attend. And, I’m glad I did.

Here’s what I heard. We are so proud of Isabella. She asks pertinent questions during current events. She answers all the comprehension questions about the book the class is reading correctly. She completes the telling time sheets correctly. She wrote in her journal. What? She wrote in her journal? She has a journal? That she writes in. Last entry: “My favorite thing about Halloween is giving the candy to the kids. I saw all the costumes.” Whatever you’re doing at home is working. Um, what’s different at home? Nothing concerning teaching. We’re a normal, disorganized family with two other kids at home. As part of Isabella’s nutritional healing, she’s taking a sort of power drink every morning. It has coconut milk, eggs, primrose, flax, and safflower oils, and phosphatidylcholine. She drinks it, along with a bevy of supplements, with no problem. In fact, she asks it.

Nutrition can change a child’s ability to learn, focus, and behave.

“Power” Drink (from Body Bio & Patricia Kane)

Mix everything together:

2 organic eggs

8 ounces coconut milk

1 tablespoon primrose oil

1 tablespoon 4:1 sunflower:flax oil*

E-lyte electrolyte drink*

liquid stevia to taste

1 tablespoon phospatidylcholine*

*available from BodyBio through a health professioanl

For more information about this potentially behavior-changing drink and nutrition counseling for children with ADHD, contact me at http://www.lauralagano.com.

Hello world!

Summer 2006 022

Ever wonder what’s it’s like to raise a child with apraxia, autism, ADHD? Probably yes if you have a child with a challenge or you know someone who does or if you’re a therapist who has dedicated your life to these children. Well, I am both of these people — a mother to a child and a nutrition practitioner. Follow me on my journey of healing my daughter, Isabella Speranza.